April 7, 2010

UK: Report looks at fear of dying in people over age 65 in ethnically diverse society

. LONDON, England / Postgraduate Medical Journal / April 2010 Edition Older people from ethnic minorities had more anxieties about dying than others, and were more likely to express fears the more extensive their family support. Enabling older people to express fears about dying is likely to be important when planning supportive end-of-life care. Practitioners should not assume that fears about dying are the same in different social groups, or that extensive family support is protective against such anxiety. These findings have implications for commissioners and practitioners of primary and secondary care. These are conclusions of a study on "Fear of dying in an ethnically diverse society: cross-sectional studies of people aged 65+ in Britain." This study aimed to examine fears, including extreme fears, of the process of dying in both homogeneous and ethnically diverse population samples aged 65+ in Britain. Personal interviews were conducted with people aged 65+ living at home responding to ethnically diverse populations in Britain. [rc] The researchers Ann Bowling, Steve Iliffe, Anthony Kessel, et al. have published an article titled "Fear of dying in an ethnically diverse society: cross-sectional studies of people aged 65+ in Britain" in Postgraduate Medical Journal. Contact Professor Ann Bowling, Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, Royal Free Campus, London NW3 2PF, UK. E-Mail: a.bowling@ucl.ac.uk Copyright © 2010 The Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine.