December 15, 2011

GREECE: He invented 19 fictional offspring to claim benefits

ATHENS, Greece / Reuters / Life / December 15, 2011

ODDLY ENOUGH

A former Greek policeman who invented 19 fictional offspring to claim benefits for what would have been the largest family in Greece has been arrested for benefit fraud, police said.


FAMILY LIFE: This scene at a home in Crete shows two pillars of Greek culture: food and family. Paradoxically,
there is no word for "family" in ancient Greek. 
Oikos, the word for household, is the closest equivalent,
encompassing family, property, and animals. 
Photograph by Reagan Wheeler, My Shot.
Illustrative photograph by courtesy of National Geographic
The former police officer, divorced and with no children of his own, quit his 1,000-euro-a-month ($1,300) job in 2001 and has been living solely on benefits ever since, police said on Thursday.

Using photographs of children he found online, the 54-year-old man forged birth certificates and other documents needed to claim benefits for at least one child a year since 1996.

Police estimate he made at least 150,000 euros in claims over 15 years, but the actual amount is probably much higher.

The fraud was so expert, police said, that they only realized something was amiss when they noticed his was the only Greek family with that many children. The average Greek family usually has two or three children.

"We have never seen (a scam) like this before," said a police official who declined to be named because he was not authorized to speak to the press.

The former policeman, who under Greek law cannot be named, was arrested Wednesday as he was about to collect 8,000 euros in benefits from an Athens branch of Greece's employment agency OAED. He was taken to the prosecutor's office Thursday.

Widespread fraud, a generous welfare state and a notoriously inefficient public sector have been blamed as root causes of Greece's financial trouble that threatens to break apart the euro zone.

A team of tax investigators recently discovered that a seemingly humble Greek farmer on the island of Thasos, who owned a red Ferrari and a Porsche, was in fact into loan sharking. ($1 = 0.7721 euros)


Reporting by Karolina Tagaris and Tatiana Fragou; Editing by Michael Roddy

Copyright: Thomson Reuters
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